Publications

Amsterdamnified Working Group Meeting (March 2019)

Amsterdamnified Working Group Meeting (March 2019)

In March 2019 the Amsterdamnified team leaders (Waite and Driedger) will be hosting a symposium for project members and a small number of guests. The meeting is scheduled for March 15 and 16, that is, the days immediately before the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting in Toronto (March 17-19). The Symposium is tentatively scheduled to take place in Toronto. More details should be available by the end of 2018.

September 2017 conference

September 2017 conference

From the 27th to the 30th of September several members of the Amsterdamnified Research Team (Ace Gammon-Burnett, Nina Schroeder, Gary Waite, and Mike Driedger) participated in an international conference organized by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies in Toronto. Three team members (Waite, Schroeder, and Driedger) even held an Amsterdamnified panel, which was chaired by friend and advisor to the Project, Prof. Piet Visser of Amsterdam. For details about the conference, go to https://crrs.ca/event/global-reformations-2017/.

2017 publication

2017 publication

Below is the table of contents for the just-published collection of essays from a Sept. 2016 conference at London’s German Historical Institute. The event was very productive for promoting dialogue among the invited researchers, but we want to open up the debate. The publication will, we hope, spark a broader set of discussions. Please feel free to join our debates online.

Three Amsterdamnified team members have essays in the collection:

  • Gary Waite, “The Drama of the Two-Word Debate among Liberal Dutch Mennonites, ca. 1620-1660: Preparing the Way for Baruch Spinoza?”
  • Mirjam van Veen, “Dutch Anabaptist and Reformed Historiographers on Servetus’ Death: Or How the Radical Reformation Turned Mainstream and How the Mainstream Reformation Turned Radical”
  • Mike Driedger, “Against ‘the Radical Reformation’: On the Continuity between Early Modern Heresy-Making and Modern Historiography”