Author: Mike Driedger

Amsterdamnified Working Group Meeting (March 2019)

Amsterdamnified Working Group Meeting (March 2019)

In March 2019 the Amsterdamnified team leaders (Waite and Driedger) will be hosting a symposium for project members and a small number of guests. The meeting is scheduled for March 15 and 16, that is, the days immediately before the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting in Toronto (March 17-19). The Symposium is tentatively scheduled to take place in Toronto. More details should be available by the end of 2018.

September 2017 conference

September 2017 conference

From the 27th to the 30th of September several members of the Amsterdamnified Research Team (Ace Gammon-Burnett, Nina Schroeder, Gary Waite, and Mike Driedger) participated in an international conference organized by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies in Toronto. Three team members (Waite, Schroeder, and Driedger) even held an Amsterdamnified panel, which was chaired by friend and advisor to the Project, Prof. Piet Visser of Amsterdam. For details about the conference, go to https://crrs.ca/event/global-reformations-2017/.

Nina Schroeder

Nina Schroeder has just completed her PhD in the Art History Department at Queen’s University (Kingston, Canada). She specializes in the fields of seventeenth-century Dutch art history and Anabaptist studies. Based on two years of field research in art museums, rare book collections, and archives in the Netherlands, Schroeder’s dissertation explores the representation of Anabaptism and Mennonitism in visual culture of the early modern Dutch Republic. She takes into account seventeenth-century polemical imagery of the early Anabaptists as well as satirical imagery of the Golden Age Mennonites and Doopsgezinden. Her work also considers contemporaneous martyr imagery and other artwork sympathetic to Anabaptist faith identity. In her research she explores the related areas of art patronage networks among Mennonite artists and patrons, and portraiture conventions among Dutch Mennonite families of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Schroeder’s PhD at Queen’s University builds upon her master’s studies in art history at the University of Oxford and her studies, which included theology and Anabaptist history, at Canadian Mennonite University (Winnipeg, Canada).

Ace Gammon-Burnett

Ace Gammon-Burnett

Ace Gammon-Burnett will be starting his MA studies at Brock U with Prof. Mike Driedger in September 2017. His research interests are broadly focused on early modern British religious and cultural history. His particular interest is the emergence of Puritanism within the Church of England, as well as the construction of theories of heresy, witchcraft, and demonology. He’ll be working toward a larger thesis project and his tentative area of research is an examination of the literary and institutional process of “heresy-making” in English Protestant print culture.

Andrew Taber

Andrew Taber

Andrew Taber is studying toward an MA degree with Prof. Gary Waite at UNB-Fredericton. His interests before attending UNB were rooted firmly in military history and the role of the Dutch in the historiography of the early modern military revolution, but his work under Gary Waite and the Amsterdamnified Project has kindled an interest in the interchange occurring between the Dutch Republic and England during the 17th century. He is currently researching how 17th-century English authors understood the policies of religious toleration enacted in the United Provinces and if or to what extent these policies affected the struggle for religious toleration occurring in England.

Brookelnn Cooper

Brookelnn Cooper

Brookelnn Cooper is studying toward an MA with Prof. Mike Driedger at Brock U. As part of her first MA Co-op work term (spring and summer 2017) she will be doing research in Amsterdam for the Amsterdamnified Project, and for her own MRP (major research paper).

Brookelnn’s current research focuses on trans-national communication networks in Europe. As a case study she is examining the printed works of John Canne (unknown-1667), an Englishman printing for the Puritan cause in both London and Amsterdam. In the context of seventeenth-century English Puritanism, and the political instability produced by the English Civil Wars and the Interregnum, Canne actively participated in the ferment of the turbulent period through his printing of radical texts at home and abroad – i.e. his separatists works like His Necessity of Separation (1634). Whenever the English tightened their controls on the press, Canne would find his way to Amsterdam, where he enjoyed the use of a relatively free press. Texts that were censored in neighbouring states were available in the Dutch Republic, often smuggled via extensive trading routes to the country of origin, giving rise to a flourishing exile printing trade. An account of Canne’s work and his movements will aid the understanding of complex early-modern trans-nation communication networks and their impacts.

John Raimondo

John Raimondo

John Raimondo has an MA in History from Brock U, where he studied with with Prof. John Bonnett. In his major research project he explored the potential of a deep-map narrative as an innovative genre for the expression of historical data. By looking at the ways deep maps can be created and conceived in augmented and virtual reality, John hopes to demonstrate to historians their value beyond the deep maps constructed to-date using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). He created a virtual deep map of the National Historic Willowbank Estate in Queenston, Ontario, Canada. The Brock News featured his project in an article from August 2017. His research interests include digital history, deep maps, spatial narratives and architecture. He is currently working in the Niagara Region as a freelance writer and researcher.

For the Amsterdamnified Project he worked with Matt Milner and Mike Driedger to make a list of Baruch Spinoza’s contacts for use in NanoHistory. The list is based on the data from https://spinozaweb.org/, which John supplemented with information from printed scholarship.